Converse Red Light Sessions

April, 2013

Red Light Radio is an online radio station broadcasting from a former prostitution window in Amsterdam’s Red Light District.

Both local and international DJ’s, bands and artists bring you daily shows going from metal to disco, indie to electronic music, old, new and from the future.

Recently Red Light Radio started a new adventure with Converse to launch the Converse Red Light Sessions. Converse presents a series of live recordings with a broad range of exciting new bands and musicians.

Check out www.redlightradio.net to tune in live or listen on demand.

Converse Ink

April, 2013

Carnaby

Chuck Taylor All Star sneakers are like a personal canvas waiting to be painted on. And now you can go pro at our customization studio at Size? Carnaby Street, London.

Maestro

At the studio you can choose from a wide array of graphics and colours to turn your new Chucks into your own personal masterpiece. Pick which sneakers you’d like to start off with, then start being creative. Our Customization Maestro’s are there to help you get the best out of your design, by providing one-on-one assistance.

Customize

The ‘Converse Ink’ customization studio is located on the first floor at Size? Carnaby Street London. So drop by, have a look and get creative.

And, don’t forget to upload a picture of your masterpieces on our Facebook page.

Converse Christmas Lights

April, 2013

Converse created an alternative Sneakers Christmas light display at Dray Walk made up of hundreds of pairs of illuminated Converse sneakers. The display was installed above giant bubble wrap hopscotch walkways at the Shoreditch and Dalston stations.

Converse also converted a truck into a portable sound system. The truck toured busy streets in the evening allowing people with a sneaker mentality to plug in their own music selections.

GET DIRTY: GALLOWS, CARNIVAL KIDS, HOAX REVIEW

April, 2013


Right from the start it was clear the final night of Get Dirty London would be taking no prisoners. Hoax are about as fresh as you can get having only existed for less than a year, but their performance was up there with bands with a lot more years on the clock. Their latest single, ‘Bitter Angry Fake’ packed an almighty punch and set the stage perfectly for the rest of the night.

Addressing the now heaving mass of sweaty revellers, Carnival Kids knew they had to give it everything they had. The Anglo-Norwegian four-piece are also new to the scene but you wouldn’t know it. Their debut single ‘Fear Of Nothing’ sounded exactly like you might expect a track with that name to sound, a concise three minutes of high intensity guitars and raw punk energy. With the band already drawing comparisons to At The Drive In and Biffy Clyro, 2013 could well be their year.


Get Dirty was always going to be a special night for Gallows, it’s been a while since they played the UK and this was their first show without recently departed guitarist Steph Carter. Their packed international schedule has also kept them from intimate spaces like The 100 Club for some time. Add these things together with a baying pack of rowdy fans and you’ve got the formula for something truly explosive. And explode they did, the whole club erupted as soon as they hit the stage and the next 45 minutes were a textbook lesson in how a punk rock show should look, sound and feel. Flying arms, legs, guitars and who knows what else collided in a cloud of sweat and madness. Without neglecting the classics, they veered musically towards newer material with ‘Cross Of Lorraine’ marking a particularly intense moment.

That concludes Get Dirty, London thanks to the packed-out crowds and all the bands for making it an amazing, intense celebration of the best music from three very different worlds.

Stay tuned to facebook.com/converse for more on Converse and Get Dirty.

GET DIRTY: GHOSTFACE KILLAH, DOOM, BISHOP NEHRU REVIEW

April, 2013

Hip hop royalty descended on the 100 Club on Thursday night with a history lesson served up by two of the godfathers of the underground scene plus a new talent playing his debut show outside NYC.

That newcomer was 16-year-old Bishop Nehru, one of the brightest new stars in a burgeoning new school of East Coast MCs. He had a lot of work to do warming the stage up for such hallowed company, but proved himself more than up to the task. His DJ dropped a succession of solid gold instrumentals including subtle nods to Wu Tang and Doom and he dropped all the highlights from his ‘Nehruvia’ mixtape, which is a good place to start if you want to hear more.


An ever-elusive character, Doom was eagerly anticipated by the crowd and he didn’t disappoint. Taking to the stage with a rendition of ‘Rhymin Slang’ from last year’s JJ Doom collaboration LP the man in the mask was in full effect. Taking the somewhat unusual approach of DJing and rapping at the same time using a laptop he teased the crowd through punchy renditions of everything from obscure classics like ‘People, Places and Things’ through to more recent cuts like ‘Gazzillion Ear’ and ‘Ballskin’.

Energy levels were already high when Ghostface Killah bounced on to the stage but him and surprise partner Sheek Louche from legendary crew The LOX ramped things up to fever pitch. Ghostface classics like ‘The Champ’ rode alongside classic Wu Tang material like ‘Protect Ya Neck’ and ODB’s ‘Shimmy Shimmy Ya’. He even invited an eager member of the audience on stage to drop the ODB verses making one lucky fan very happy indeed.

With the old and new schools of the East Coast thoroughly represented the second night of Get Dirty, London was a hip hop lovers dream, onwards to Gallows and heavier musical territory.

Stay tuned to facebook.com/converse for the latest on Converse and Get Dirty

GET DIRTY: THE CRIBS, DRENGE, CHINA RATS REVIEW

April, 2013

Night one of Get Dirty, London set the bar high with three bands from Yorkshire covering three very different styles. A broad slice of the best rock and roll the UK is producing was served up across three action packed hours. Kicking things off were Leeds four piece China Rats who channeled vintage riffs and vocal harmonies on raucous crowd pleasers like last year’s ‘Be Like I’. Recently back from SXSW the boys have a packed schedule for the rest of the summer and it’s easy to see why.

Drenge are an all-together different proposition, these two brothers strip things down to just guitar and drums in the style of classic double acts like the White Stripes or newcomers like Deap Valley, who Drenge have supported. A short, sharp shock of dirty and driving riffs followed that sounded at once classic and brand new. It doesn’t veer too much in to psychic territory to feel like these brothers have an intimate stage connection; the drums, guitar and vocals bob and weave together in perfect imperfection. Seek them out, you won’t be disappointed.

Almost ten years has passed since The Cribs last played The 100 Club, something they fondly remembered on stage, before announcing, “Welcome to adulthood” with something of a wry smile. If this is adulthood then it’s the kind anyone can get behind, an exuberant mix of youthful energy and razor sharp lyrics. The set was a treat for old and new fans, with classics like ‘Men’s Needs’ jutting up against recent release ‘Leather Jacket Love Song’. They even opened things up to the crowd at one point, resulting in 2007’s ‘Girls Like Mystery’. They closed with fan favourite ‘City Of Bugs’, sung more by the crowd than the band, and everyone was still singing it as they spilt out in to the warm spring air on Oxford St. Two more nights to come…

Stay tuned to Facebook.com/converse for the latest on Converse & Get Dirty.

GET DIRTY: HOAX INTERVIEW

April, 2013

Who or what are your biggest influences?

We listen to absolutely everything. Everything from death metal to bluegrass, country, funk,hip-hop, grime, hardcore, downtempo, sometimes folk..sometimes. Our sound is always developing but we try and tick all our musical influences when writing. Keeps our options open and our creativity buzzing at all times!

Which country or city in the world is your favourite to play in, and why?

We love playing the places we don’t usually get the chance to play but London takes some beating. Its where we are all based, all our friends and family come down, great hangs and parties after the show.

Would you say live music is more vibrant than ever? Or is there a ‘golden era’ in the past you wish you could have been involved in?

I think more bands are realising live performances are increasingly important now due to lack of record sales, which is great to see as your guaranteed a great night. But the early 60s with the rise of funk soul R&B movement would have been magical!

Who’s the hardest working artist/band in the business?

I’d have to say Cancer Bats or While She Sleeps, those dudes tour all year round, and work it hard! So nice to see the old school attitude of just jumping in a van and playing wherever, whenever, however many show they possibly can! Love it.

How important is the visual element of a show, lighting, projections etc? Or should the focus just be the artists on stage?

I think it’s got to be a bit of both. There’s something magical about both sides, just getting up plugging in and going for it creates such a raw vibe but having full production can visually blow your mind as well.

If you could support any band past or present, who would it be…?

James Brown

…and what would you talk about backstage?

I’d just sit quietly and watch. All the time.

Hoax play The 100 Club, London on April 19th with Carnival Kids and Gallows. For full information and updates head to facebook.com/converse

GET DIRTY: BISHOP NEHRU INTERVIEW

April, 2013

Who or what are your biggest influences?

Nas, MF DOOM, Wu Tang, Black Moon, Eminem, Pharrell. Everyday life also influences me and my music.

Would you say live music is more vibrant than ever? Or is there a ‘golden era’ in the past you wish you could have been involved in?

I definitely wish I could have be involved in the hip-hop golden era and I’m going to try to do everything I can to make the golden era come back at least for a little while.

Who’s the hardest working artist/band in the business?

Me and My team.

How important is the visual element of a show, lighting, projections etc? Or should the focus just be the artists on stage?

Yeah, I don’t think lighting or any of that matters you know, I think the main focus should be on the artist and the music he’s putting out.

If you could support any band past or present, who would it be…?

AZ, he needed a lot of support he didn’t get. The dude’s SO underrated.

…and what would you talk about backstage?

I don’t know but backstage at this show i’ll probably be trying to find DOOM and Ghostface so they can sign some vinyls and take a selfie with me.

Bishop Nehru plays Converse Get Dirty at The 100 Club, London. April 18th. Stay tuned to facebook.com/converse for updates.

GET DIRTY: DRENGE INTERVIEW

April, 2013

Who or what are your biggest influences?

Tough one. I’ve never modeled myself on any particular musician and we haven’t done that as a band either, we tend to just listen to a load of stuff, which bears no relation to what we play, and it’s hard to figure out how much of a stake it has in the outcome. Covers are the best thing when you’re learning how to play because it gives you a direction and teaches you how songs are put together, and we probably wouldn’t be anywhere now if it wasn’t for Keane’s ‘Somewhere Only We Know’.

But when you start getting caught up learning other peoples’ solos and recreating set ups then you start to lose your own identity. I try not to think too much about what’s already been done, even if it is as tremendous as Keane’s songs are. Our music is by no means especially cutting edge, it’s something we just find ourselves doing.

Tell us about the hardest tour you’ve done, any good stories?

I went on a school trip to Denmark when I was 16 playing drums with my school’s jazz and brass bands, and a few of us got drunk one night at a Michael Jackson tribute concert (who wouldn’t?!) Our punishment was losing the chance for all the Year 11s to go out for a kebab with the teachers on the last night. We got a lot of kebab hungry cold shoulders the next few days.

Which country or city in the world is your favourite to play in, and why?

We played a few shows in Dingle in Ireland at the end of last year and I haven’t found anywhere that tops it yet. If there’s anywhere with a nearby dolphin and high concentration of brightly coloured pubs, let me know.

Who’s the hardest working artist/band in the business?

R Stevie Moore has probably put out more music this year than we’ve ever written. He has a huge discography.

If you could support any band past or present, who would it be…?

They’re not a band, if we could support any one, it would be Sheffield FC. They’re the oldest club in the world. Maybe we could play a half time show, whilst they’re handing out the oranges, but I’d be more content in the stands supporting.

…and what would you talk about backstage?

The early 1-2-7 formation. How can you justify having 7 attackers and 1 defender?! Madness. I’d need that explaining. They’ve had a bus named after them too! I wonder if they get free fares.

Drenge play The 100 Club, London on April 17th with The Cribs & China Rats. For full information and tickets go HERE.

GET DIRTY: GHOSTFACE KILLAH INTERVIEW

April, 2013

Ghostface Killah has been doing the rap thing since way back in the early 90s, blasting to prominence in 1993 as part of the now legendary Wu Tang Clan alongside RZA, GZA, ODB, Method Man and more. All of the Wu Tang went on to become successful colo artists and Ghostface is no exception, ploughing his own unique furrow with highly praised storytelling abilities and that inimitable quick-fire, gravelly flow. Over ten solo LPs, countless mixtapes and collaborations he has cemented his reputation as one of the finest to ever jump on the mic, his work with Doom, as Doomstarks has been amongst his most hotly anticipated and the chance to see the two share a stage is a rare treat for real hip hop fans. Here’s a few words from the man himself:

Who or what are your biggest influences?

I’m influenced by God.

Tell us about the hardest tour you’ve done, any good stories?

The longest tour was Projekt Revolution with Linkin park. At the tour’s end they flew in tattoo artists from the shops they own in Arizona and hooked up the whole tour crew with tattoos.

Which country or city in the world is your favourite to play in, and why?

I love every city I play.

Do you write when you’re on the road, what inspires you?

Writing, going to the gym and praying.

Would you say live music is more vibrant than ever? Or is there a ‘golden era’ in the past you wish you could have been involved in?

I would have liked to be in the 70s era.

Who’s the hardest working artist/band in the business?

I feel like that’s what I do. I keep recording, keep touring and constantly on my grind.

How important is the visual element of a show, lighting, projections etc?

I think the combo of both is important. I have not really done the lights and production I have in my mind. Soon though.

If you could support any band past or present, who would it be…?

I’d like to go out with Linkin Park again. But if we goin back it would have to be with a fly 70s group…

…and what would you talk about backstage?

Gentleman don’t tell tales about what goes down backstage.

Ghostface Killah plays The 100 Club, London on April 17th with Doom. For full information and tickets go HERE.